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By Adam Brady
Director of Publications & New Media
for the Ducks and Honda Center.
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POSTED ON Thursday, 08.08.2013 / 7:05 PM

New (or old, depending on how you look at it) Duck Dustin Penner agreed to take part in a live chat with fans -- who submitted questions via the web and Twitter -- on Wednesday afternoon. Here's a little of what we learned:

- If you call him to start the chat a little after the promised time of 1 p.m., he answers the phone with, "You're four minutes late."

- He figured Teemu Selanne would announce his return to the Ducks as soon as the ink hit the paper for Penner's signing with the team. When asked if he thought 8 would return, he sarcastically replied: I would think he'd come back pretty quickly after I signed and said, "Now that Penner's back..." I'm pretty disappointed he hasn't already.

- He was inevitably asked about the pancake incident from when he was in LA, and came back with:
Obviously the severity of the incident has become more of a comedic thing. But I probably have had pancakes at least twice this offseason without incident. I'm more of a bacon and eggs type of guys anyway. #PrayForDustin.

- He named his dog Ryback, and there is a long, intricate story as to why: I got him at a canine ranch Adelhorst in San Bernardino where a lot of law enforcement get their dogs. It's a place where dogs train to detain criminals. It happened to be that Steven Segal was getting a dog too. He was looking at the same one I was and he had first dibs, and they gave him a week to buy it. He had to run things by his family and he ultimately said no. I swooped in there and took the dog, and named him after the character he plays in Under Siege.

- His favorite restaurant in Newport Beach? A good choice: I'd say The Cannery, for sure. They've got really good sushi, and it's kind of a one-stop shop. You can get everything there.

- Asked if he trash-talked his Ducks friends when he was with the Kings, he referenced this YouTube video (which I hadn't seen before): I made it a point to talk trash to those guys, especially Getzlaf and Perry. There was a play, I think it's on YouTube, where Perry chirps me, and I get up and line him up, knock him down and kind of land on top of him on his back. He lays there crying. I knew he was faking it, so that felt pretty good.

- At one point old teammate and friend Joffrey Lupul asked via Twitter if Penner was going to skate with him and "the boys" the next day, and Penner came back with: I'll be there contingent on him picking up my ice fee, and I'll pick up his green fee later in the day.

- He was later asked by Bobby Ryan what his handicap was in the Golden Tee golf video game: I'd say about a plus-12. I'd have to give you about eight strokes a side.

- On what he eats postgame:
After games most players don't have the stomach to eat. But sometimes you have to eat if you have a game the next day. More times than not, you just have a shake and go to bed. When I do eat after, I like to have some pasta with a light sauce.

-
He was asked who would play him in a movie about his life: Hopefully Vince Vaughn. Both of us like to talk a lot and joke a lot, and can be a bit confrontational and passive-aggressive.
(P.S. He used a different word for "confrontational" but we asked him to choose a different one.)

- Favorite movies? The Big Lewbowski and both Bad Boys movies. Favorite band? A trio of DJs called Above and Beyond.


- How he unwinds after a game is different than it was during his years in Edmonton:
Depending on what time the game ends, you might have a couple beers with friends down at a beach bar. You can go a little more unnoticed down here than Edmonton. But more times than not, people don't bother you too much. They just say, "I'm a fan. Have a nice night." But depending on what time it is, I might just take the dog down to the beach after a game. It's always nice to have the ocean in your back yard.

- The first thing he did after signing with the Ducks? Go on a serious run on the links: I actually did make three birdies on a row after the news broke, so that had to be a good omen.

- He likes his iPad on the plane, and an occasional poker game: I watch movies on my iPad. A lot of guys play poker and other card games, like snarple and 7-up 7-down. I stay away from the other games, but I'll play poker.

- Growing up, he looked up to: Definitely my dad, but Mario Lemieux was someone I always idolized.

All in all, Penner was just as engaging, funny and occasionally biting as we'd expect. And based on the number of questions that came in that unfortunately weren't able to be answered, we'd definitely like to do another one of these chats with him down the road.

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POSTED ON Monday, 07.01.2013 / 5:18 PM
If you recall, three months ago in this space we posted a pretty cool commercial Teemu Selanne made for Finnish milk company Valio Suomi. The commercial had its own "making of" video to accompany it, but the Ducks video crew also shot some footage during the filming of the commercial and have their own look behind the scenes:



Teemu, when talking about the demanding schedule the shoot entails, says, "I don't know if I could be an actor."

It's fine, we're happy with him being a hockey player for at least a few more years.

But speaking of Teemu as an actor, we had a commentor on our Facebook page remind us that Teemu did a bit of acting along time ago for another Finnish commercial, this one for some kind of online shopping service in Finland. If you haven't seen it, this is a beauty:


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POSTED ON Friday, 06.28.2013 / 4:24 PM
It was good news to Ducks fans, teammates and staffers (like myself) when it was announced Thursday that Ben Lovejoy had agreed to a new three-year contract. It's not just because what Lovejoy did on the ice as a shutdown defenseman, who was a huge asset after being acquired by the Ducks from Pittsburgh in early February (and played great in this year's playoffs). But Lovejoy brings a quirky, smart and often funny personality to the Ducks locker room.

While Ducks fans were happy to be keeping Lovejoy around for another few years, teammates were as well, based on a couple of tweets:

Lovejoy commented on that tweet in this Q&A I did with him on Friday: "When I got traded, I got put in a corner next to Bobby Ryan, who has been awesome. We really bonded in that corner. Also in that end of the locker room is Teemu, Getzlaf and Perry. So now with me signed, we have all the high-rollers locked up. I need to text our trainers to make sure I still have my locker room spot next to Bobby."

And on the #hesaheadcase remark: "I’m not a superstitious guy, but I have a lot of routines. And I think Bobby is just as bad, if not worse. So he’s dishing it out a little."

Here was Kyle Palmieri's reaction on Twitter:

In case you missed it, Lovejoy admitted his germaphobia (I think that's the word) when I interviewed him about playoff beards just before the postseason started:

“I’m a chronic handwasher," he said. "I don’t like shaking hands, I just don’t like touching things. People give me a hard time for not being a dog lover or an animal person. It’s not that I don’t like them, I just don’t enjoy touching them.”

I asked him if he shakes hands or goes with the Howie Mandel fist bump.

“I will tough it out,” he said, “and then pull out some hand sanitizer when I have to. I carry it with me all the time.”

I asked how long it’s been the case. “It’s been awhile,” he said. “My teammates here have recently discovered it. I get a hard time, but I think they understand.”

They better. They'll have those quirks around the locker room and the road for another three years.

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POSTED ON Monday, 05.20.2013 / 12:55 PM
Some of the Ducks took to Twitter to thank fans for the season. 




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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.30.2013 / 7:20 PM
Palmieri is favored by most Ducks to grow the best one. Says Lovejoy, “Palmieri is a fairly hairy dude, so I think he would grow a very grizzly beard.”
This feature also appears in Ducks Digest, the official publication of the Anaheim Ducks.

It is a Stanley Cup tradition almost as engrained as the Cup itself. The longer and thicker it gets, the better you’re doing. And there is a certain point of pride in growing one to the point of unruliness and maximum scruffiness.

It’s the playoff beard, a long-held tradition in which players grow their facial hair at the start of the postseason and refuse to shave until their team is either eliminated or they are lifting the Cup over their heads.

The custom is believed to have started with the great New York Islanders teams of the 1980s, which must have been doing something right, since they won four straight Cups. Some say it goes back to the elite Montreal teams of the late ‘70s. Either way, it has spread well beyond the NHL – to minor, junior and European leagues and, in the case of the Ducks, even to many of the male team employees.

The frequent itchiness and grumblings of wives and girlfriends is a small price to pay for such a sacred custom. Among the legendary Ducks, Teemu Selanne and Scott Niedermayer each had bodacious beards by the time they captured the Cup with a Game 5 victory over Ottawa in the Stanley Cup Final. Goalie J.S. Giguere did not grow one that year, but had a strikingly thick one by the time he was handed the Conn Smyth Trophy in a seven-game defeat to New Jersey in the 2003 Final. 

For most of the current Ducks, growing playoff beards is on the agenda, with high hopes that they will be forced to keep it for a very long time. Although, some players have greater expectations for their whiskers than others.

Ben Lovejoy

I actually have a pretty manly playoff beard, even though I do not enjoy having facial hair. It itches, and I get made fun of around here because I’m a bit of a germaphobe. I like keeping clean and nicely shaven. But I do it because it’s an important tradition. It’s the profession I’ve chosen, and I’ve been lucky enough to go on some long playoff runs and grow it out because of it. You tough it out because it’s that sort of bunker mentality. Everyone grows one, and I look forward to having a beard for over eight weeks coming up.

Niedermayer’s salt-and-pepper look during the ’07 Stanley Cup Final is unquestionably the greatest playoff beard in Ducks history.
Emerson Etem
I’ve got a little something going, not too much. When it grows, it comes in pretty thick. It’s nothing special, nothing really to brag about. I usually grow it out, but I’ve got to start like a month and a half before. It takes quite a bit of time. Once it gets going, it’s greasy and nasty.

Kyle Palmieri
I’m pretty excited about it. I had a little one going last year when we were in Syracuse [of the AHL], but it was only for a week or two. I’m really looking forward to it this year. It comes in very fast for me. It gets thick, but it doesn’t really grow that long. I don’t think I’ve gone past two weeks or so, because it can look pretty bad.

Bobby Ryan
I’ve done it in the past and I’m going to do it again. I don’t trim it. I just let it get wild. Pretty soon my face will turn a shade of red from the hair color.

Francois Beauchemin
It’s part of the tradition and I don’t trim it at all. It gets pretty good.

Toni Lydman
I’ve been trying every time, but my growth isn’t strong. It’s tough to tell. Trust me, I don’t have to touch it. It’s barely there.

Jonas Hiller
I’ve been working on once since Christmas, but as you can see, it’s not really successful so I’ll probably have to skip that. To be honest, there’s not a whole lot growing. Secondly, I don’t really like it under the mask. It starts to get really itchy, and I never really got into it. I tried a couple times, but it [felt] more annoying than having it help me.

Matt Beleskey
Yeah, I’ll be growing one. It won’t be much, so I’m not going to trim it or clean it up.

Giguere had a substantial beard by the time he accepted the Conn Smythe trophy following Game 7 of the ’03 Final.
Meanwhile, opinions vary on who will have the best and worst beards, but one young Duck was an almost unanimous choice:

Etem
“Palms” [Kyle Palmieri] would be top 3 on the team for sure, since he’s so hairy anyway. I bet Bobby can grow a pretty good one. We have a pretty clean-cut team for the most part. The worst  would probably be Viktor [Fasth]. Probably the nastiest and grossest is Sami [Vatanen].

Lovejoy
Palmieri is a fairly hairy dude, so I think he would grow a very grizzly beard. As for the others, some of these European guys might struggle. Viktor [Fasth] seems into his appearance, and I look forward to seeing him and Jonas try and grow nice beards.

Ryan
Palmieri, definitely. Daniel Winnik is pretty hairy, and I think Ben Lovejoy can grow a pretty strong playoff beard too. The worst? Cam Fowler and Corey Perry, hands down.

Palmieri
I’d say I’m in the running for the best, but there will be a couple guys who can definitely grow a nice one. Bobby already has a good one at times. I’ve seen pictures of “T” [Teemu Selanne] from ’07. I expect him to have a good one.

Selanne had a nice growth going in the '07 playoffs, but Beauchemin is not impressed.
Lydman
Palmieri is good, Beauch [Francois Beauchemin] might be good. Maybe Sheldon [Souray]. Bryan Allen might be a sneaky strong playoff beard guy. The worst would be me, maybe Viktor. I don’t think Hillsy [Hiller] has a good one.”

Hiller
Palmieri would have the best, probably. Bobby Ryan’s looking pretty good right now. Shelly [Souray], the new addition, I don’t know how he’s looking. Daniel Winnik could be a good one too. It’s definitely interesting. Corey Perry would be the worst. It’s out there. I don’t want to throw myself under the bus, but it’s Corey Perry.

Beleskey
“Palms.” I mean, just look at his face. The worst would probably be me or Toni Lydman.

Beauchemin
Shelly, Palmieri, Bobby. I don’t know about Daniel Winnik’s beard. For the worst? I’d go with Teemu. He’s got that weird jawline beard thing going on.”


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POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.24.2013 / 2:14 PM
Ducks youngsters Emerson Etem and Peter Holland have grown quite accustomed to each other, and it’s clear in the way they talk about living together. For most of the season, the two have been roommates on the road and live in the same hotel (but different rooms) in Anaheim. Although, Holland -- who played 21 games with the Ducks this season -- recently was sent down to Norfolk of the AHL.

After a practice a couple weeks ago, the 20-year-old Etem and 22-year-old Holland gave very tongue-in-cheek accounts of what living together is like. Both came across as refreshingly sarcastic and funny when talking about each other. (An example: Etem not laughing and barely smiling when he calls Holland "selfish" and Holland doing the same when he says, "You've got to babysit him a little bit."

And away we go:

What do you like about living with your roommate? 
Holland:
The list of what I don’t like is a lot longer. No, “Emer” is a lot of fun and we have a lot of fun together. He’s someone to go out with for bites to eat and we hit the beach a little bit. He’s from close by [Long Beach], so I’ve had a chance to meet his parents and see where he grew up, which was kind of cool.

Etem: He’s a funny guy. He can get on my nerves a little bit sometimes, but he’s a good guy. We have our inside jokes and we have quite the chemistry. We like the same things, and we’re always doing things together. It works out pretty well.

What don’t you like about your roommate?
Holland:
He’s left me behind twice at the rink so far this year. We’ve been driving together for a long time up here in Anaheim and somehow he’s managed to forget me. We’ve had our ups and downs, but I’ve managed to straighten him out.

Etem: He’s pretty selfish. I have my car here, so if he needs a ride it’s always on me. The other day he had a test for a college course he’s taking, and I had to drive him 20 minutes out of my way. He said, “You can stay here and wait for me while I do my test or you can leave.” So I just took off back to the hotel, and he tried to make me feel bad about it. The fact that he made me do that on our off day was quite selfish.

Holland: He likes to be a little bit late in the mornings, which is getting a little old – especially because he’s the driver and I have to wait for him. He’s a young guy, still maturing, so you’ve got to babysit him a little bit.

Etem: My buddies come to a lot of the games, and we want to get a bite to eat after the game. I’m the type where if I’m ready to go, I just go. If my buddies and I are talking about it, I tend to forget about Peter and go with my buddies [laughs].

Who controls the remote on the road?
Holland:
There is a lot of pressure to have the remote. Someone is always not happy. But we’re pretty good about sharing it.

Etem: Going back to being selfish, we check into the hotel, we lie down, he grabs his computer and tosses the remote back to me. He expects me to do all the controlling when I just want to sit back and relax. Someone’s got to do it, but the fact that it’s me every time gets kind of frustrating.

What do you typically watch together?
Holland:
Traditionally we try and see what kind of movies are on TV and we’ll try to come to an agreement on one. We get along pretty well on that.

Etem: Usually I just throw it on SportsCenter. I’m that basic guy. At the end of a long day of travel or practice or whatever, when you get to the hotel you just want to keep it simple, and sports is usually the way to go.

What is the situation like at the hotel at home?
Holland:
He’s on the VIP floor at the hotel, but he has to insert a key to get to that floor. When he does that, I like to hit all the other buttons to make him stop at every floor on the way up, just to let him know he’s not that special. I don’t know why he’s on that floor and I’m not. He got a king-sized bed and I’ve got two doubles, but I have more room for activities in my room, so it’s kind of nice. [Note: In case you don't know, this line is a very subtle reference to the movie "Stepbrothers" but I can't post a YouTube link because of some language in the clip.]

Etem: I think the VIP floor has its perks, but it has its disadvantages. Me being the wiser one, they put me up there in case I need to come down and check on him. You need a room key to get up there, and I don’t think they want him bothering me too much.

How do you think he could describe you as a roommate?
Holland:
If he didn’t tell you I was a great roommate and a great friend, he’d be lying.

Etem: He would probably talk bad about me, but I know what he’s all about. He’s kind of fake and puts up that fake vibe [laughs]. I’ll just let that one go and maybe have a talk with him later.

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.16.2013 / 6:29 PM
“I’m a chronic handwasher. I don’t like shaking hands, I just don’t like touching things. People give me a hard time for not being a dog lover or an animal person. It’s not that I don’t like them, I just don’t enjoy touching them.”
Ducks defenseman Ben Lovejoy was a popular figure in Pittsburgh during parts of five seasons with the Penguins, and in two-and-a-half months in Anaheim, it’s been easy to see why.

It’s not just that Lovejoy has been playing admirable defense for the Ducks since they picked him up in a trade for a fifth round pick on February 6. (Bruce Boudreau recently called him, "Everything and more than we've asked.) And it’s not only that he frequently delivers hits that reflect neither Love nor Joy.

Talk to him away from the rink, and he’s a very easy guy to like. The 29-year-old from Concord, New Hampshire has a unhurried, methodical way of speaking that is packed with intelligence and flashes of humor – almost like he’s thinking of the perfect way to deliver a sentence as he’s uttering it. (It should be noted, by the way, he spent four years at Dartmouth.)

For example, here is him earlier this year on why he earned the nickname Rev, after Reverand Lovejoy from “The Simpsons” (which is reflected in his Twitter avatar): “When I first became a pro hockey player, people started calling me Rev. I watched the show growing up, so I knew it well. All the guys in Pittsburgh called me Rev pretty regularly.

"We were in Canada one day watching Sportscentre. I made a play and the announcer called me ‘The Reverend!’ The next day Mike Rupp, who was then my teammate in Pittsburgh, came in and couldn’t believe the announcer knew my nickname. Rupp wasn’t a ‘Simpsons’ fan, so he didn’t know. It has very little to do with my religious affiliation. It’s an uncommon name and that character has made it famous, so I’ve embraced that.”

Today I was talking to Lovejoy about a feature we’re developing on playoff beards, and he good-naturedly admitted that he’s a longtime germaphobe.

“I’m a chronic handwasher,” he said. “I don’t like shaking hands, I just don’t like touching things. People give me a hard time for not being a dog lover or an animal person. It’s not that I don’t like them, I just don’t enjoy touching them.”

I asked him if he shakes hands or goes with the Howie Mandel fist bump.

“I will tough it out,” he said, “and then pull out some hand sanitizer when I have to. I carry it with me all the time.”

I asked how long it’s been the case. “It’s been awhile,” he said. “My teammates here have recently discovered it. I get a hard time, but I think they understand.”

That being said, he has high hopes for the playoff beard, and he couldn’t have put it any better: “I actually have a pretty manly playoff beard, even though I do not enjoy having facial hair. It itches, and usually like keeping clean and nicely shaven.

“But I do it because it’s an important tradition. It’s the profession I’ve chosen, and you tough it out because it’s that sort of bunker mentality. Everyone grows one, and I look forward to having a beard for over eight weeks starting in May.”

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POSTED ON Monday, 04.15.2013 / 2:18 PM
They're all highly paid professional athletes, but like anyone else, the Ducks once had jobs that were a far cry from playing hockey for a living. For a feature in Ducks Digest, we asked the Ducks to talk about their first jobs.

(Ducks Publications and New Media Associate Kyle Shohara contributed to this piece.)

Teemu Selanne
When I was 15, I started working with a construction company carrying bricks and helping all the guys there. I lasted just one summer. It was hard work, but it’s a great workout and I treated it that way. I didn’t need any workouts after that.

Sheldon Souray
I had to clean engine parts for semi-trucks. My hands were in Varsol (solvent) all day scrubbing oil, sludge and filth off of old engine parts. I was 15. I didn’t last that long. Maybe a couple weeks, until I burned the first couple layers of skin off my hands from being in those chemicals all day.

Francois Beauchemin
It was delivering the Le Journal de Montreal back home. I was 12 years old, and I had to go every morning delivering 120 newspapers. It was around 4:30 to 5 in the morning before I went to school. It was all year long. They only didn’t deliver newspapers on four days -- the 25th and 26th of December and January 1st and 2nd. I loved it. It gave me money to buy some stuff.

Bobby Ryan
When I was 14, I was a skate guard at a rink in Westminster during open-ice skates. I handed out rental skates to people, and I had to make sure when people fell they were okay. My mom worked at the rink too, so that’s how I got that job. I got free ice time, so that was cool.

Matt Beleskey
When I was in Grade 9 or 10 I was a mover. I moved furniture for two summers in Barrie (Ontario) for the Rockbrune Moving Company. It was crazy hours. You’re there at 7 until you’re done, but it was good money then. Those summer days it got a little hot, but it was good.

Peter Holland
The only thing I really did was work at hockey schools in Brampton (Southern Ontario) when I was 12 or 13. I worked with a guy named Joey Simon that I actually still work with. He ran March break camps and stuff like that, so I’d go out there and help him out. I’d help him push pucks around and help teach little kids what I knew at the time. It’s something I knew how to do, so it was fun.

David Steckel
When I was 16 I worked in a plant in Wisconsin in the shipping and handling department, so I drove forklifts.

Toni Lydman
One summer when I was 17 I was basically shoveling dirt. That was tough. I quit the job after two weeks because it was getting too hard with hockey practices. I got too tired and had no energy. My friend was telling me “You’re not getting any money then,” so I convinced him to work there too. He lasted two weeks.

Kyle Palmieri
I worked at a hockey pro shop shooting on goalies in New Jersey. I was probably 12 or 13. It was only for the summer, in the offseason. One of my coaches was a goalie coach and I basically went in and shot on goalies. I basically got paid to shoot pucks, so it was pretty fun.

Ben Lovejoy
When I was 15 or 16 I worked at a summer restaurant. I cooked French fries and fried fish in a Frialator machine. I would leave super greasy after an eight-hour shift. The restaurant was called The Baited Hook.  

Viktor Fasth
I was moving a library that was changing locations, all the books. I had to place all the books in the right order in boxes. I was probably 13 or 14. It was paid but not much. I didn’t enjoy it, but it was only a four-week job. It was during the summer between schools. It was good to get some money.

Emerson Etem
I was a newspaper delivery boy when I was around 11 years old. It was called the Beachcomber. I would strap on my roller skates and get around 500 papers. My dad would come home early from work and help me roll them. If he didn’t, then I’d have 500 papers to roll by myself. Then I’d go out. It would probably take me from 5- to 9 p.m. It was quite a shift. I probably did this for three or four months. It was every two weeks and it wasn’t too bad, but it was a battle. I enjoyed it because I was getting paid at that young of an age. The little that was coming in I was happy about.
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POSTED ON Thursday, 04.11.2013 / 5:46 PM
He’s had an outstanding season for the Ducks, and should be ranked among the best in the league, but Francois Beauchemin’s name hasn’t come up much when talks arise of Norris Trophy candidates. “It should come up,” Bruce Boudreau said a few days back. “On what he’s done and where we are in the standings and how much he plays and how important he is to us — all those factors.”

Beauchemin leads all Ducks defensemen in points this season with 22 in 41 games, and he trails only teammate Sheldon Souray for the league lead in plus-minus at +23 (matching his Jordanesque uniform number). But the numbers hardly do justice to Beauchemin’s game, as he routinely is sent over the boards to shut down the opponent’s top forward line. He's blocking shots, delivering bone-jarring hits, eating up minutes on the penalty kill and occasionally delivering a missile of a slap shot from the blue line.

So naturally, that type of play is an open invitation to put Beauchemin through a round of our Ducks Off the Ice pop culture and personality questions. After a 40-minute practice today, the Ducks had their last team signing of the year, which also means free lunch for the players. Beauchemin sat down alone with a club sandwich at a table set up on the Honda Center concourse, a perfect time to pepper him with a few hard-hitting ones:

Q: If you could meet any celebrity, who would it be?
Beauchemin: Oh, that’s a tough one. [Long pause] Wow. Like an actor?

Anyone. Could be an athlete.
[Longer pause. I check the recorder to make sure it’s running] You gonna run out of batteries there?

No, it’s fine.
I would say Tiger Woods.

Who is your celebrity crush?
[No pause this time.] Kate Beckinsale.

What music do you love?
AC/DC. I've always been a fan.

What music do you hate?
My son (six-year-old Samuel) loves Justin Bieber, and I think he’s a little annoying. He also listens a lot to Gangnam Style, which I don’t like but I’m getting over it.

What TV shows do you watch religiously?
The Voice. I love that show. Grey’s Anatomy. Those are the two my wife and I watch regularly.

What movie have you seen the most?
Probably Any Given Sunday and Men of Honor with Robert Deniro and Cuba Gooding Jr.

You can eat, by the way.
[Opens sandwich but hesitates to start on it.]

What’s your favorite thing to eat?
A good steak. Love steak.

What’s a food you refuse to eat?
I used to hate tomatoes, but I don’t know if it’s my age or anything, but lately I’m eating them a little bit more. I don’t say no to too much. I like pretty much everything.

[Getzlaf walks by, heading to the food table and asks, “What’d you go with, Beau?”
“The club, but I can’t tell you if it’s good yet.”]

What gameday superstitions do you have?
It’s more of a routine than a superstition. I get up, drop my kids at school, get a coffee and some breakfast, come here for the skate. Then we go eat at the same place all the time. I usually nap from 2 to 4, then I’ll stop at Starbucks again on the way to the arena. I used to drink green tea before every game, but I’ve switched to coffee.

Do you have any phobias?
Heights. Any time I’m on top of steps or an elevator and I can see down, that worries me. Flying is okay because I don’t really look down.

Teemu is a bad flyer.
Yeah, I’m not that bad.

What athlete would you trade places with?
[Getzlaf sits down at the table and Beauchemin nods toward him.] I’d trade cars with him.

How about non-teammate?
[He thinks for awhile before Perry sits down and offers Tony Stewart, the race car driver.] Beauchemin: Yes! Tony Stewart. Thanks, Pears. I don’t know if you’d call him an athlete, but he would be a good one.

Who is the funniest guy on the team?
[Getzlaf: Sbisa is the funniest looking.] I think Cogs is pretty funny. He jokes around a lot. [Getzlaf: In a weird way though.] Yeah, in a weird way.

Who is the best-dressed guy on the team?
Shelly [Sheldon Souray] is trying. He’s into the fashion. I wouldn’t say he’s the best-dressed, but he’s the most fashionable. He comes out with stuff that nobody else would wear.

He’s got a few tattoos. Do you have any?
No. It’s never been my thing.

You’re French-Canadian. Give me something that sounds better in French than English.
[Getzlaf: Nothing.] Hey, hey … There are certain things, but I don’t think I can say any of them.

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.09.2013 / 12:51 PM
Ducks youngsters Cam Fowler and Kyle Palmieri have roomed together on the road the entire season and recently talked about the experience. (This feature also appears in Ducks Digest, the official gameday publication of the Anaheim Ducks.)

What do you like about your roommate?

Kyle Palmieri: We’ve been good friends since our first year at the [USA Hockey National Team Development Program], so it’s been five or six years now. I wouldn’t say we grew up together, but when you think about it, over the past five or six years spending that much time with one guy as a common denominator is pretty awesome. We’re lucky enough to room together. I think we get along really well. I know we have fun together.

Cam Fowler: He’s fun and he’s a good guy. We know each other well from the national team so we have some familiarity there and he’s always keeping me on my toes. He’s very quick-witted. He’ll give it to you but he’s able to take it. He’s always joking around sarcastically but he’s fun to be around.

Do you have any complaints?
Palmieri: The only thing is, one of us needs to establish control of the remote. That’s the one thing. Neither of us likes controlling it, having that kind of pressure. So we usually do a little scoring competition during pregame skates or practices on the road. The loser has to take control of it for the next little bit. Neither of us really wants it. We watch all the same shows but there’s a lot of pressure to put on the right one.

Fowler: He doesn’t like to control the remote so we battle with that a lot. We started that [scoring competition] now because it ends up someone just throws the remote at the other person and you just deal with it, so we’re trying to fix that.

What do you two usually watch together?
Palmieri:
We watch a lot of Seinfeld or if there are any good movies on we’ll throw those on. Just whatever is on, really. Doesn’t matter to us.

Fowler: We like movies. We watch Seinfeld and Big Bang Theory, stuff like that.

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve learned about your roommate?
Palmieri: The weirdest thing is him setting a second alarm but still getting up on the first one. And then he just lets the second one go while he’s in the shower. It’s frustrating, to say the least.

Fowler:
He’s just getting hairier day by day. [Editor's note: This appears to be true.]

Who takes more time getting ready?
Fowler: I think we’re pretty much the same there.

Palmieri: It’s pretty equal. We both take a pretty long time, but nothing ridiculous. Nothing like Nick Bonino. He’s the worst. There’s not much hair to move around, but he takes his time on each piece.

What do you think your roommate would say about rooming with you?
Palmieri: I’d say he’d have the same complaints like no one takes control of the remote. And I think some of my sarcasm kind of wears on him a little bit. I’d say those are his two biggest complaints.

Fowler: He would say I’m a great guy to have and he’s lucky to have me.

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STANDINGS

WESTERN CONFERENCE
  TEAM GP W L OT GF GA PTS
1 ANA 35 22 8 5 101 96 49
2 CHI 32 22 9 1 100 64 45
3 STL 32 21 9 2 98 78 44
4 NSH 30 20 8 2 81 59 42
5 SJS 33 18 11 4 94 85 40
6 WPG 33 17 10 6 80 76 40
7 VAN 31 18 11 2 89 88 38
8 LAK 33 16 11 6 90 82 38
9 CGY 34 17 15 2 98 92 36
10 MIN 30 16 12 2 86 78 34
11 DAL 31 13 13 5 89 104 31
12 COL 31 10 13 8 78 99 28
13 ARI 31 11 16 4 72 100 26
14 EDM 33 7 20 6 69 110 20

STATS

2014-2015 REGULAR SEASON
SKATERS: GP G A +/- Pts
R. Getzlaf 34 12 25 7 37
R. Kesler 35 11 15 -2 26
S. Vatanen 35 9 15 -1 24
C. Perry 23 14 8 11 22
M. Beleskey 35 15 3 11 18
C. Fowler 34 3 14 1 17
J. Silfverberg 35 4 12 3 16
H. Lindholm 34 4 11 12 15
P. Maroon 27 2 12 -5 14
D. Smith-Pelly 31 4 8 3 12
 
GOALIES: W L OT Sv% GAA
J. Gibson 2 2 0 .927 2.28
F. Andersen 18 5 4 .913 2.41

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